You wouldn’t call Kentucky a good shooting team – at least not by the typical definition

You wouldn’t call a good shooting team — at least not by the typical definition of the phrase.

Aaron Harrison - photo by Tammie Brown | WildcatWorld.com
Aaron Harrison – photo by Tammie Brown | WildcatWorld.com

For example, the Wildcats shoot about 34 percent from 3. The team’s most frequent 3-point shooter, guard Aaron Harrison, is 25-of-88 on the season. The team’s best 3-point shooters, and Devin Booker, have attempted just 89 3s combined. As a group, shoots 3s on just 30.5 percent of its overall field goal attempts, which ranks 255th nationally. John Calipari’s offense is not designed around multiple-read screens and pindowns away from the ball. It’s just not how UK is built.

Not that it has mattered. For most of the season, was a good shooting team in a much more literal sense. The Wildcats’ offense was one of the nation’s best because UK’s size was so dominant that it didn’t need to make perimeter shots. Instead, it devoured buckets around the rim. Lobs, dump-ins, drives, and a hearty supply of offensive rebounds and putbacks made the Wildcats plenty efficient on offense. Perimeter touch was a non-required, pleasant bonus.

All of a sudden, and somewhat weirdly, this is no longer the case.

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